|
|
|
|
logo
Tuesday, June 18, 2024
FOLLOW US ON
Find Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Follow Us on Google Plus Youtube
AUTOMOBILE CITY GUIDE CLASSIFIEDS Cookery Craft JOBS MOVIES NEWS EDUCATION VIDEOS YELLOWPAGES Real Estate MORE
 
 

  Movies
  Indian Cinema
  Show Times
  Bollywood
  Gossips
  Features
  Interviews
  Legends
  Trailers
  Profiles
  Previews
  Stills
  Box office
  Reviews
  Music Reviews
  Wallpapers
  Posters
  Coming Soon
  Top five Music
  Star Birthdays
  Hollywood
  Gossips
  Features
  Reviews
  Previews
  Stills
  Wallpapers
  Trailer
  Games
  Coming Soon  
  Box office
  Oscar Awards
  Regional
  Gossips
  Previews
  Stills
  Reviews
  Trailers
  Songs
  Profiles
  Coming soon
  Box Office
  Top Five Music
  State Awards
  Awards
  Oscar Awards
  National Awards
  Filmfare Awards
  Phalke Awards
 State Awards
  India Facts
  Tell a Friend
  Feedback
 
Reviews
Ankahee
Cast
: Aftab Shivdasani,Amisha Patel,Esha Deol
Directors
: Vikram Bhatt
Producer
: Pritish Nandy,Rangita Pritish Nandy
Music
: Pritam Chakraborty
Rating
: **
 
Preview
Review
Stills
Trailers
Wallpapers
It's the Other Woman's fault...always. She's the home-breaker and the disruptive force creating havoc in doctor Shekhar's (Aftab Shivdasani) life.

This is Vikram Bhatt's cathartic voyage into the damned world of infidelity. Though "Ankahee" deals with situations, feelings and positions that aren't comfortable to contemplate, the director brings a certain freshness and élan to the dynamics of the extra-marital relationship.

Unlike Mahesh Bhatt's "Arth" to which Vikram's film pays homage, "Ankahee" tries to tell the story of betrayal and redemption from both the husband and wife's point of view. "Arth", if one may recall that classic, restricted itself to the wife's point of view.

Ameesha Patel, looking frail, lovely and vulnerable, gives her best shot to the wife's role. The script provides her generous space to put forward the bereft and betrayed wife's case.

Esha Deol has the author-backed role. Seen completely from the outside (a la Smita Patil in "Arth"), her character gets its jittery edge from the actress' untapped layers of provocative and impassioned uncertainties.

But it's the husband's take on the unfaithful mistake that provides the most interesting fulcrum to the murky yet mollifying triangle. As played by Vikram Bhatt's favourite actor Aftab Shivdasani, Shekhar is a weak-willed but noble soul who betrays his utterly devoted wife for a glamorous and unhinged woman who shrieks shouts whines and whimpers, all at once.

Esha's portrayal of the Other Woman is shockingly denuded of sympathy. We see her as a basket case alternating between rage and depression, forcing the man to his knees, making you wonder why the hell would a decent guy get involved with a hysterical 'manic depressive' (as certified by the film's in-house shrink played by a totally miscast Amin Hajee).

Initially the doctor-actress relationship reminds you of Vijay Anand's "Tere Mere Sapne". That's before Vikram Bhatt gets seriously explorative about infidelity. The way he uses spaces between the man and his wife as their marriage comes apart at the seams is truly a sign of maturity in the mellowing director.

Pravin Bhatt's camera goes for sighing long shots to denote a state of alarming estrangement between the couple. Vikram Bhatt's fascination with "Arth" becomes evident in sequences such as the one where the wife lands up at the hyper-strung actress' place to plead for her marriage through a closed door.

More originally, there's a sequence where, to cover up for his unfaithful sojourn in Goa, the guilt-ridden husband screams, "Why do you have to be so devoted to me? Why is it always about me?"

Girish Damija's dialogues catch the tenor of a suburban relationship without losing their cool intensity. That goes for the rest of the film, which is at once anxious and laidback, agitated and calm. The synthesis of serenity and neurosis gives the narrative a cutting edge.

What you miss are those spatial expanses that separate a feature film from a soap opera. To preserve a sense of intimacy, Bhatt shoots most of the film in confined spaces with glimpses of the outdoors lending a strange feeling of curbed freedom to the narration.

What cannot be doubted is the director's integrity of purpose. The characters' anguish rings true quite often, thanks to routine references to Mumbai's newspapers and rendezvous points.

The cast is sincere and dedicated to the task of making the triangle look convincing. More peripheral characters would have connected the plot to a larger social context.

There's an interesting cameo by an actor playing Esha Deol's devoted man Friday who observes his benefactor's lapse into paranoiac passion with stoic grief. You will find such mute and loyal observers all over the film industry.

"Ankahee" courts silence on many occasions. Pritam's background score is mildly evocative. But the songs try to be unnecessarily trendy in their intensity.

 
Review of other movies

QUICK LINKS - WEBINDIA123.COM
CAREER OPTIONS
DATES AND EVENTS
INSTITUTES IN INDIA
STUDY ABROAD
UK, USA, Canada
CLASSIFIEDS
JOBS
MATRIMONIAL
ASTROLOGY
GORGEOUS CELEBRITIES
VIDEOS
E-CARDS
BEAUTY AND STYLE
HEALTH
COMMUNITY
FOOD
YOGA
CRAFTS
GARDENING
PHOTOS
Shopping
DEALS AND DISCOUNTS
YELLOW PAGES
TOUR PACKAGES
POCKET DICTIONARY
EVENTS
NEWS
WORLD TIME
DONATE BLOOD
AUTOMOBILE
CITY GUIDE
DANCE
FESTIVAL
FINANCE

GOVERNMENT

HISTORY
INDIAN CRAFTS
INDIA FACTS
law
MEDICINE
MUSIC
NRI
PERSONALITIES
RELIGION
SPICES
SPORTS
TOURISM
WILDLIFE
WOMEN
Kochi Biennale 2014
Andaman and Nicobar
Dadra and Nagar Haveli
Jammu and Kashmir
Manipur
Rajasthan
Andhra Pradesh
Daman and Diu
Jharkhand
Meghalaya
Sikkim
Arunachal Pradesh
Delhi
Karnataka
Mizoram
Tamil Nadu
Telangana
Assam
Goa
Kerala
Nagaland
Tripura
Bihar
Gujarat
Lakshadweep
Orissa
Uttar Pradesh
Chandigarh
Haryana
Madhya Pradesh
Pondicherry
Uttaranchal
Chhattisgarh
Himachal Pradesh
Maharashtra
Punjab
West Bengal

Copyright 2000- Suni Systems (P) Ltd.
All rights reserved