Sunday, October 21, 2018
Fairs & Festivals
 »  » Lohri

Lohri

Lohri
Place: Punjab
Significance: Worshipping fire to pay homage to sun god.
Date: 13.1.2018

This is the famous festival of Punjab, the Hindu festival which falls regularly on the 14th of January every year or on the last day on the month of 'Paus'. Like many other festivals in India, Lohri is also related to the agricultural activities of the farmers. It marks the harvesting season in Punjab and the end of the winter season. The main event is making of a huge bonfire which is symbolic of the homage to the Sun God for bringing in warmth. 

Lohri is the time after which the biting cold of winter begins to taper off. Preparation to celebrate Lohri begins way before the actual festival day. Right through the winter days, village women and children collect dry twigs, branches and cow dung cakes to make a huge bonfire on the day of Lohri-the bigger the better.  Circumambulating the holy fire is compulsory before anyone joining the celebration.  Lohri is an individual's function but celebrated collectively. On the day of the festival, with the setting of the sun, the bonfire is lit with people singing and dancing to the tune of Lohri songs. The festivities include the boisterous Bhangra dance and chanting of mantras around the fire.  The munching of seasonal goodies like popcorn, reori, peanuts and sugar cane forms an integral part of the celebration. Fistfuls of these goodies also find their way into the fire, as an offering to the Sun God, the giver of all life.

Woman folk prepare a pudding of spinach, mustard leaf and lentil cooked in sugar cane juice which is believed to purify blood and cleanse our body from within. 

The next day of Lohri is known as Maghi, a day that signifies the beginning of the month of Magh. According to common belief, this is an auspicious day to take holy dip and give away charity. Kheer is prepared in sugar cane juice to mark the day. This is particularly a happy occasion for the couples who for the first time celebrated Lohri after their marriage and also the first Lohri of the son born in a family. Children visit homes in the neighbourhood and sing songs. The festival conveys the message -- the bond of brotherhood and the spirit of oneness should prevail despite all odds.




Festivals - Punjab

BaisakhiChhapar Fair
Gurpurab- Guru Nanak's BirthdayIn General
Jarag FairMuktsar Fair
Other FairsPracheen Kala Kendra Nritya and Sangeet Sammelan
Roshni Fair